An eight-alarm fire in a New York City building clears hundreds

An eight-alarm fire in a New York City building clears hundreds

More than 300 firefighters and paramedics fought the blaze in a New York City main building on Tuesday that left scores of families dead, fire officials said.

There were no serious injuries to the eight-fire alarm in Jackson Heights, Queens, which broke out at 1 p.m. on the top floor of a six-story building, officials said.

But 21 people, including 16 firefighters, were injured. Firefighters suffered severe injuries, but two firefighters were burned, said FDNY Deputy Assistant Head Michael Gala.

The building houses about 150 flats, and 90 families – about 240 people – have been left homeless, Gala said.

“There will be many families, many of whom will need accommodation tonight,” Negro said, according to a video from the scene.

FDNY Commissioner Daniel A. Nigro said on Wednesday it had taken 12 hours to catch fire. The fire could have grown significantly due to delays in notifying FDNY, according to the Commissioner.

He said the cause of the fire had not been determined because the building was so badly damaged that fire engines could not enter.

Investigators know that one person who escaped the blaze left the door open, allowing the fire to spread through the corridors and other areas, Negro said on Tuesday.

Tracking the increase in coronavirus cases in the United States

“We have emphasized over the years the seriousness of that – if you unfortunately have a fire in your home or apartment, how important is it to close that door,” said Negro.

No one was reported missing, firefighters searched the entire building, Gala said. Of the five non-firefighters injured, four refused treatment, and one was taken to hospital, he said.

FDNY Commissioner Daniel A. Nigro said on Wednesday it had taken 12 hours to catch fire. The fire could have grown significantly due to delays in notifying FDNY, according to the Commissioner.

He said the cause of the fire had not been determined because the building was so badly damaged that fire engines could not enter.

Photographs of helicopters show the thick black smoke coming from a building in the distance.

About 350 firefighters and EMS personnel were at the scene sometime on Tuesday evening.