A California teacher sings for her students to build confidence

A California teacher sings for her students to build confidence

Booser, a 34-year-old teacher at Franklin Elementary School in Santa Barbara, California, wants to provide students with the tools for effective living, which they believe begin with confidence. Booser has set aside time to publish daily in his classes and the song he has written for himself is full of good confirmation sung before each test.

Inspired by the famous children’s song, “Against Me,” Booser changed his lyrics to fit his teaching philosophy, which built his confidence. In a video shared with CNN, Booser is seen walking into his classroom shouting, “I believe in me, I believe I can, I believe I will try my best,” taking a break after each student’s agreement to join and repeat behind him.

Booser says he has been singing for years before being tested in his class.

“I think it’s important for kids to see … your teacher dances informally in class with a mask and a microphone,” Booser said. “I know the connection we have because [students] are like them, look at my goofball teacher, I can now show my madness.”

Since launching the singing song program, Booser said he has seen the confidence of his students and their ability to concentrate improve. Booser tells his students that he doesn’t care if they get 100 or 50, as long as they try their best.

Exercising anxiety as a child, Booser praised his teachers for helping him overcome those concerns. That experience has revealed much about his creativity in his class today.

“I needed that as a child. I needed those teachers who said, ‘I believe in you, you got this, you’re strong and you know it.’ When I was with those teachers, my behavior changed, and my self-esteem grew and I wanted to give my students that opportunity, “said Booser.

In line with Booser’s pre-test singing habits, he also made time for publishing time in his class. Starting with the prompt “I am,” Booser asks students to fill in the rest, drawing them with examples such as, “I’m healthy,” or “I can.” Booser said his students enjoy writing, often reminding him of their “I am” journals on memorable days.

The epidemic has transformed Booser’s class into a powerful one, with some of his students studying inside and others going almost. That made his singing and writing style very important.

Daily writing enables students to manage their frustrations and challenges, which Booser considers a great win because it provides an opportunity to take a break and have a discussion about the student’s situation.

Booser believes that starting these types of conversations with children at an early age is important because it gives them the tools to express how they feel. He admitted that his students may not know what all his guarantees mean, such as being able to be brave or courageous, but they understand much more than what adults can give them credit for.

“They’re sponges, especially 8- and 9-year-olds putting everything inside,” Booser said.

At the end of the day, Booser views the teacher as a gift. It gives her the opportunity to make a difference in the life of a child who she hopes will also make a difference in the world.